Biblio >> CitizenSchool: A case study in multi-disciplinary, multi-cultural, group-based active learning

CitizenSchool: A case study in multi-disciplinary, multi-cultural, group-based active learning

TitleCitizenSchool: A case study in multi-disciplinary, multi-cultural, group-based active learning
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year2019
AuthorsO'Reilly D
Conference NameEdTech
Date Published05/2019
PublisherIrish Learning Technology Association
Conference LocationDundalk, Ireland
Abstract

This paper looks at a three-year long EU Erasmus+ project that involved three colleges from Ireland, Belgium and Portugal. As part of the project, over 50 students from the three colleges took part in two ten-day international intensive game-coding activities. The paper examines the students’ engagement with the project and analyses the students’ feedback relating to multi-disciplinary, multi-cultural, group-based active learning. 

The project is called CitizenSchool. The aim of the project is to develop a set of mini-games that can help young people to understand and discuss various misconceptions relating to migrants and refugees in the EU. The target audience for the mini-games is 15-18 year old secondary school pupils from across the EU. The project is a collaboration between three colleges (Dundalk Institute of Technology, Ireland; Artesis - Plantijn Hogeschool, Belgium; and ISPGaya - Instituto Superior Politécnico, Portugal) and three non-governmental organisations (Le Partenariat, France; Studio Globo, Belgium; and Stedenband Haarlem-Mutare, Netherlands). The project is fully-funded by the EU under the Erasmus+ programme.

Each of the two ten-day intensive game-coding activities involved 24 international students plus students from the host college. Students were split into teams. Teams were made up of students who studied in various undergraduate disciplines, such as games development, computer science, tourism, business and education. During the ten days, students were expected to develop prototype game ideas and to present their final games to a panel of non-governmental organisation experts. 

At the end of each of the two ten-day intensive game-coding activities, participating students were asked a set of questions relating to group work, active learning, motivation and professional development. This paper looks at the student responses to these questions.